Nene Valley Osteopathy

46 Brook Street, Raunds, Northamptonshire, NN9 6LP

Tel: 01933 624 323

Georgina Bull is a graduate of the British College of Osteopathic Medicine, qualifying in 2006 with a BSc (Hons) in Osteopathic Medicine, along with a Diploma in Osteopathy and a Diploma in Naturopathy. Georgina is a registered osteopath with the General Osteopathic Council, and also the British Osteopathic Association. Combined with this, she is a member of the Osteopathic Sports Care Association.

Since graduating, Georgina strives to keep continuing her professional qualifications by attending courses in techniques, keeping up to date with the latest practices. In 2011, she completed the British Medical Acupuncture Society (BMAS) course and also practices Medical Acupuncture alongside Osteopathic treatments. Georgina is registered with BMAS as a practising therapist.

Georgina has completed kinesiotaping courses in Facial Movement Taping (FMT)1, and FMT 2 with Rocktape, allowing herself to be called a RockDoc, and certifying her to use a full range of taping techniques from symptom reduction to performance modification. Additional courses with Rocktape see her adding further skill sets such as using functional movement patterns to diagnose injuries and strengthen the body, along with Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Massage for those hard to shift sports injuries.

Alongside general practice, Georgina has a keen interest in treating sports injuries, and finds enjoyment in working with athletes to improve their performance as best she can. Se has competed with the British Equestrian Team in endurance at the World Equestrian Games in Aachen, Germany 2006, and has worked as the Travelling Osteopath to both the Senior and Elite Endurance Team competing for Team GBR at both European and World level.

See below for the latest Nene Valley Osteopathy news, facebook posts and tweets and posts

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1 day ago

Audubon Aquarium of the Americas

Thinking about trying acupuncture? You’re not alone! Even penguins have acu! It can be great for relieving arthritic pain, along with other painful conditions. Still not sure? Come and have a free See more

“We’ve been doing acupuncture on Ernie to help him feel better. And the results are just nothing short of astonishing.” 🐧 #AudubonStories

A huge thanks goes out to Benbow Veterinary Services!

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3 days ago

Kindred Academy

I love this little moving image by Kindred Academy. They’re osteopaths themselves, and this just encapsulates all we believe in.

“An osteopath is taught that Nature is to be trusted to the end”

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5 days ago

Anatomy In Motion

Ever wondered what makes that “click” sound?

What makes your knuckles pop?

If you’ve ever laced your fingers together, turned your palms away from you and bent your fingers back, you know what knuckle popping sounds like. Joints produce that

Joints are the meeting points of two separate bones, held together and in place by connective tissues and ligaments. All of the joints in our bodies are surrounded by synovial fluid, a thick, clear liquid. When you stretch or bend your finger to pop the knuckle, you’re causing the bones of the joint to pull apart. As they do, the connective tissue capsule that surrounds the joint is stretched.

By stretching this capsule, you increase its volume. And as we know from chemistry class, with an increase in volume comes a decrease in pressure. So as the pressure of the synovial fluid drops, gases dissolved in the fluid become less soluble, forming bubbles through a process called cavitation. When the joint is stretched far enough, the pressure in the capsule drops so low that these bubbles burst, producing the pop that we associate with knuckle cracking.

It takes about 25 to 30 minutes for the gas to redissolve into the joint fluid. During this period of time, your knuckles won’t crack. Once the gas is redissolved, cavitation is once again possible, and you can start popping your knuckles again.

As for the harms associated with this habit, according to Anatomy and Physiology Instructors’ Cooperative, only one in-depth study regarding the possible detriments of knuckle popping has been published. This study, done by Raymond Brodeur and published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, examined 300 knuckle crackers for evidence of joint damage. The results revealed no apparent connection between joint cracking and arthritis; however, habitual knuckle poppers did show signs of other types of damage, including soft tissue damage to the joint capsule and a decrease in grip strength. This damage is most likely a result of the rapid, repeated stretching of the ligaments surrounding the joint. A professional baseball pitcher experiences similar, although obviously heightened, effects in the various joints of his pitching arm. But assuming you haven’t signed a multimillion dollar contract to constantly pop your knuckles, it hardly seems worth the possible risk to your joints.

On the positive side, there’s evidence of increased mobility in joints right after popping. When joints are manipulated, the Golgi tendon organs (a set of nerve endings involved in humans’ motion sense) are stimulated and the muscles surrounding the joint are relaxed. This is part of the reason why people can feel “loose” and invigorated after leaving the chiropractor’s office, where cavitation is induced as part of the treatment. Backs, knees, elbows and all other movable joints are subject to the same kind manipulation as knuckles are.

First Seen Here: http://bit.ly/LbGyG0 See more

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1 week ago

Today’s (and tomorrow’s) job? First aid re-qualification. We make sure we keep you safe from all angles!

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1 week ago

TH Fitness

Wow, this is shocking that people feel the need to use steroids to look good just because of a TV programme.

Just like women are pressured to look a certain way due to media and celebrities, men are just as much under the same pressure 👎

Steroid use has many health risks yet young men (and older) are

We were all born to look a different way. Short, tall, slim, heavier. It would be a boring world if we all looked the same 😁

Train to be healthy, train to make daily activity easier. train to maintain quality of life ❤✌

We all end up in the same place at the end. Don’t risk it guys👊

#SteroidUse #MediaPressure #DrugUse #HealthRisks See more

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1 week ago

TORQ Fitness

I’ve recommended these to many patients, especially those who compete in their chosen discipline over the summer months. Torq products are great and don’t taste artificial either.

2:1 Maltodextrin:Fructose (MF) Rapid Energy Delivery Since 2005. If it has been suggested to you by anyone that products formulated at 2:1 MF are somehow revolutionary and new, it’s simply not the

We’ve never wasted our time or money seeking celebrity endorsements to try to influence you, we’ve just got our heads down, reviewed the research and produced the finest Performance Nutrition products money can buy. If World Class athletes are using our products, it’s because they want to or have been advised by their nutritionists to do so.

We’ve always been light years ahead in terms of innovation and have worked tirelessly on our natural flavour profiles. Although our 2:1 MF energy drink flavours might sound relatively mainstream (Orange, Lime & Lemon, Pink Grapefruit, Blackcurrant and Vanilla), our energy gel flavour profiles are on another level. How about Rhubarb & Custard, Apple Crumble, Raspberry Ripple, Cherry Bakewell and Lemon Drizzle? Or Black Cherry Yoghurt, Strawberry Yoghurt or Banoffee?

Above all, these exceptionally potent energy products also fit into the TORQ Fuelling System. Conceived way ahead of its time back in 2012, we devised a way to make fuelling endurance performances with optimal carbohydrate delivery extremely simple by organising all of our fuelling products into 30gram carbohydrate units.

To find out more about the TORQ Fuelling System, click on this link: http://www.torqfitness.co.uk/torq-fuelling-system

To find out more about our 2:1 MF TORQ Energy Drink, click on this link: https://www.torqfitness.co.uk/product-category/nutrition/fuelling-system-products/energy-drinks

To find out more about our 2:1 MF TORQ Energy Gels, click on this link: https://www.torqfitness.co.uk/product-category/nutrition/fuelling-system-products/gels

#ThePowerOfTORQ #NaturallySuperior #AtYourService.

Research References:

1. Stellingwerff, T & Cox, GR. (2014)
Systematic review: Carbohydrate supplementation on exercise performance or capacity of varying durations. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2014 Sep;39(9):998-1011.

2. Wilson. PB., Ingraham, SJ. (2015)
Glucose-fructose likely improves gastrointestinal comfort and endurance running performance relative to glucose-only. Scand J Med Sci Sports. [Epub ahead of print].

3. Currell, K & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2008)
Superior endurance performance with ingestion of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 40(2):275–81.

4. Triplett, D., Doyle, D., Rupp, J., Benardot, D. (2010)
An isocaloric glucose-fructose beverage’s effect on simulated 100-km cycling performance compared with a glucose-only beverage. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 20(2):122–31.

5. Tarpey, M.D., Roberts, J.D., Kass, L.S., Tarpey, R.J., Roberts, M.G. (2013)
The ingestion of protein with a maltodextrin and fructose beverage on substrate utilisation and exercise performance. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 38(12):1245–53.

6. Rowlands, D.S., Swift, M., Ros, M., Green, J.G. (2012)
Composite versus single transportable carbohydrate solution enhances race and laboratory cycling performance. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 37(3):425–36.

7. Baur, D.A., Schroer, A.B., Luden, N.D., Womack, C.J., Smyth, S.A., Saunders, M.J. (2014)
Glucose-fructose enhances performance versus isocaloric, but not moderate, glucose. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 46(9):1778–86.

8. Rowlands, D.S., Thorburn, M.S., Thorp, R.M., Broadbent, S.M., Shi, X. (2008)
Effect of graded fructose co-ingestion with maltodextrin on exogenous 14C-fructose and 13C-glucose oxidation efficiency and high-intensity cycling performance. J Appl Physiol. 104:1709–19.

9. O’Brien, W.J & Rowlands, D.S. (2011)
Fructose-maltodextrin ratio in a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution differentially affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate, gut comfort, and performance. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 300(1):G181–9.

10. O’Brien, W.J., Stannard, S.R., Clarke, J.A., Rowlands, D.S. (2013)
Fructose–maltodextrin ratio governs exogenous and other CHO oxidation and performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 45(9):1814–24.

11. Rowlands, D.S., Swift, M., Ros, M., Green, J.G. (2012)
Composite versus single transportable carbohydrate solution enhances race and laboratory cycling performance. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. 37(3): 425-436.

12. Smith, J.W., Pascoe, D.D., Passe, D., Ruby, B.C., Stewart, L.K., Baker, L.B., et al. (2013)
Curvilinear dose-response relationship of carbohydrate (0–120 g·h−1) and performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 45(2):336–41.

13. Roberts, J.D., Tarpey, M.D., Kass, L.S., Tarpey, R.J., Roberts, M.G. (2014)
Assessing a commercially available sports drink on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, fluid delivery and sustained exercise performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 11(1):1–14.

14. Jentjens, R.L., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C.H., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2006)
Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates are elevated after combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise in the heat. J Appl Physiol. 100(3):807–16.

15. Jeukendrup, A.E & Moseley, L. (2010)
Multiple transportable carbohydrates enhance gastric emptying and fluid delivery. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 20(1):112–21.

16. Davis, J.M., Burgess, W.A., Slentz, C.A., Bartoli, W.P. (1990)
Fluid availability of sports drinks differing in carbohydrate type and concentration. Am J Clin Nutr. 51(6):1054–7.

17. Jentjens, R.L., Venables, M.C., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
Oxidation of exogenous glucose, sucrose, and maltose during prolonged cycling exercise. J Appl Physiol. 96(4):1285–91.

18. Jentjens, R.L., Achten, J., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
High oxidation rates from combined carbohydrates ingested during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 36(9):1551–8.

19. Wallis, G.A., Rowlands, D.S., Shaw, C., Jentjens, R.L., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2005)
Oxidation of combined ingestion of maltodextrins and fructose during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 37(3):426–32.

20. Jentjens, R.L., Moseley, L., Waring, R.H., Harding, L.K., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J Appl Physiol. 96(4):1277–84.

21. Jentjens, R.L & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2005)
High rates of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation from a mixture of glucose and fructose ingested during prolonged cycling exercise. Brit J Nutr. 93:485–92.

22. Fuchs, C.J., Gonzalez, J.T., Beelen, M., Cermak, N.M., Smith, F.E., Thelwall, P.E., Taylor, R., Trenell, M.I., Stevenson, E.J., van Loon, L.J. (2016)
Sucrose ingestion after exhaustive exercise accelerates liver, but not muscle glycogen repletion compared with glucose ingestion in trained athletes. J Appl Physi. [Epub ahead of print].

For reviews see…

Jeukendrup, A.E. (2010) Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. Jul;13(4):452-7.

Rowlands, D.S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., Bailey, D. (2015) Fructose-Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Med. Nov;45(11):1561-76. See more

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1 week ago

Born To Be An Equestrian

Don’t let anything stop you or get in your way.

Respect 🙋

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2 weeks ago

LADbible

Is anyone else feeling like this?!

This cat is all of us during the heatwave 😂

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2 weeks ago

Chronic Pain

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2 weeks ago

Lake District Search And Mountain Rescue Association – Ldsamra

How is everyone coping in the heat right now? If you’re not doing so well, and are concerned you’ve got heat stroke, make sure you can differentiate between that and heat exhaustion. Stay well See more

There have been an increased number of heat related call outs over the last week.

Heat related illness is very serious. Please make sure you take plenty of fluids with you and keep hydrated

Take your time and seek shade where possible to rest.

This also affects our 4 legged friends, avoid walking through the middle of the day and ensure you take water for them as well! Plan your route where there is water to drink and bathe.

If you require Mountain Rescue dial 999 and ask for Cumbria Police

Enjoy the great weather! See more

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